Maryland Ignition Interlock License Restriction

Maryland Ignition Interlock License Restriction is a statewide license restriction program for drivers with multiple alcohol-related traffic offenses that is designed to reduce alcohol-impaired driving recidivism. The use of ignition interlock license restrictions requires those with previous alcohol-related driving offenses to pass a breath analyzer test of blood alcohol levels before starting a vehicle. The program further requires that drivers who are applying for reinstatement of their driving licenses install the ignition interlock system in their vehicle and continue to use it for two years before they are eligible for reinstatement.

The ignition interlock device requires a potential driver to blow into a breath alcohol sensor connected to the vehicle’s ignition system before the vehicle’s engine will start. An on-board computer analyzes the alcohol concentration of the driver’s breath and compares it to a set point, usually .02 grams per deciliter. If the alcohol concentration is above the set point or the driver does not provide a breath sample, the interlock prevents the vehicle engine from starting. Ignition interlocks are comprised of four basic elements: 1) A breath alcohol sensor installed in the passenger compartment of a vehicle and connected to a control unit in the engine compartment that allows the engine to start only upon an acceptable breath test; 2) A tamper-proof system for mounting the control unit in the engine compartment; 3) A data-recording system that logs breath test results, tests compliance, and collects other state-mandated data; and 4) A retest system which, after the engine has started, requires the driver to provide additional breath samples (generally every 10 to 15 minutes) to ensure that the driver remains alcohol-free. Several minutes are provided for the driver to exit traffic and move to a safe location for retesting.

The qualifying studies for Blueprints were Beck et al. (1999) and Rauch et al. (2011), which conducted evaluations of the program in the state of Maryland by randomly assigning 1, 387 and 1,927 drivers to treatment or control groups, respectively. Beck et al. (1999) reported that drivers with the ignition interlock system were significantly less likely to recidivate in the year in which they had the system installed as compared to the control group, and this benefit was maintained in the following year after system removal. Results for Rauch et al. (2011) showed that drivers with two years of interlock installation, relative to controls, had a lower hazard of committing an alcohol-related offense with sustained effects two years following the intervention period.

Citations
Beck, K. H., Rauch, W. J., Baker, E. A., & Williams, A. F. (1999). Effects of ignition interlock license restrictions on drivers with multiple alcohol offenses: A randomized trial in Maryland. American Journal of Public Health, 89, 1696-1700.

Rauch, W. J., Ahlin, E. M., Zador, P. L., Howard, J. M., & Duncan, G. D. (2011). Effects of administrative ignition interlock license restrictions on drivers with multiple alcohol offenses. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 7,127-148.

Read the Program Fact Sheet

Issue No. 8


Welcome to the Blueprints Bulletin

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We look forward to helping elevate evidence-based programs by sharing information about our programs and what we are doing at Blueprints. Enjoy!

Leadership Letter:
Greetings from Pamela Buckley and Karl Hill

It is with great honor and excitement that we write our first newsletter as leaders of Blueprints. In doing so, we reflect on our mission — which is to provide a registry of evidence-based interventions that are effective in reducing antisocial behavior and promoting a healthy course of youth development and adult maturity — and how our scope has grown over the history of the program.

•  Blueprints began in 1996, through funding from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, with a focus on youth programs designed to prevent violence, delinquency and drug and alcohol use.

•  In 2012, with funding from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, we expanded our scope to include positive youth development outcomes such as mental and physical health, self-regulation, and educational achievement.

•  In 2016, with funding from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation, we further expanded our work to include a focus on interventions designed to prevent crime, with an emphasis on reducing the risk of reoffending or other outcomes associated with recidivism, including employment, mental health and substance use.

This newsletter features interventions we have certified that fall within our focus of crime prevention among adult offenders. Please follow us on Facebook and Twitter to stay current on recent interventions we certify – as we are constantly updating our registry.

Thank you for your support and Happy Holidays!

Sincerely,


Pamela Buckley, PhD
Director, Blueprints Initiative
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Pamela.Buckley@colorado.edu


Karl G. Hill, PhD
Principal Investigator
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Karl.Hill@Colorado.edu

2018 in Review
By the numbers

We are proud to report that in actively reviewing the program evaluation literature and receiving nominations from the field, we accomplished a lot in 2018! Below is a summary of our year in review.

Interventions Reviewed & Certified in the Past Year

•  Number of Unique Interventions Reviewed = 231
•  Number of Individuals Articles or Reports Reviewed = 305
•  Number of Interventions Certified = 7
Small Schools of Choice (Promising)
Added: Nov. 16, 2018 Learn more
Drug Court: Baltimore City (Promising)
Added: Nov. 12, 2018 Learn more
Offender-Focused Policing (Promising)
Added: Oct. 22, 2018 Learn more
Rochester Forensic Assertive Community Treatment (Promising)
Added: Oct. 8, 2018 Learn more
Early College High School Model (Model Plus)
Added: June 4, 2018 Learn more
ParentCorps (Model)
Added: May 14, 2018 Learn more
HIPTeens (Promising)
Added: Feb. 27, 2018 Learn more

Sights on 2020
Thank you to everyone who made our 2018 Blueprints Conference possible!

We successfully hosted over 600 participants at our 7th bi-annual Blueprints Conference this past April.

All of the presentations and keynote session recordings from the 2018 Blueprints Conference have been uploaded to the conference website, so feel free to check them out.

Make sure you are following us on Facebook and Twitter, as well as checking the Conference Website for updates on our next conference, scheduled for April 27-29, 2020.

We look forward to seeing you again at the next Blueprints Conference in 2020!

Featured Model Plus Program
Maryland Ignition Interlock License Restriction
Blueprints Certified: 2016
Ages Served: Adults
Program Outcome: Crime (DUI offenses)
Maryland Ignition Interlock License Restriction is a statewide license restriction program for drivers with multiple alcohol-related traffic offenses that is designed to reduce alcohol-impaired driving recidivism.Learn more > >

Featured Promising Program
Rochester Forensic Assertive Community Treatment (R-FACT)
Blueprints Certified: 2018
Ages Served: Adult
Program Outcome: Crime
Rochester Forensic Assertive Community Treatment (R-FACT) is an outpatient treatment program to reduce recidivism and promote recovery among justice-involved adults with a serious mental illness. The program is an adaptation of assertive community treatment (ACT), developed to prevent psychiatric hospitalization and promote housing stability. However, ACT alone has not been shown to reduce recidivism.Learn more > >

Blueprints News & Resources
Relevant articles and helpful resources
In case you’ve missed them, here are a few newspaper articles and web postings that feature some of our Blueprint’s Model and Promising Programs:

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ParentCorps

A family-centered intervention that is delivered as an enhancement to pre-kindergarten programs serving children living in low-income neighborhoods.

ParentCorps is an evidence-based intervention that enhances Pre-K programs in schools and early education centers serving primarily children of color from low-income communities. It helps the important adults in children’s lives — parents and teachers — to create safe, nurturing and predictable environments at home and in the classroom and improves relationships and communication between parents and teachers. ParentCorps includes three main components: professional learning for leaders, teachers, mental health professionals and parent support staff, parenting program for families of pre-k students, and social-emotional learning classroom curriculum for pre-k students.

For more information visit the factsheet

HIPTeens

HIPTeens is a sexual-risk reduction program that targets nonpregnant, sexually active teenage girls. The program includes four weekly, 120-minute sessions.

HIPTeens is a sexual-risk reduction program that targets nonpregnant, sexually active teenage girls. The program includes four weekly, 120-minute sessions. At 3 and 6 months after the initial intervention, two 90-minute booster sessions are offered. The intervention is delivered in small groups (6-10 girls) by trained program facilitators. The intervention (a) provides HIV and sexual health information, (b) strives to increase motivation to reduce sexual risk behaviors and (c) allows time to practice interpersonal and self-management skills that facilitate sexual risk reduction. The intervention uses developmentally appropriate strategies such as games, group activities and role plays to deliver program content.

For more information visit the factsheet

Open Court Reading

A program that provides elementary grade children with a positive and effective early academic experience and strong, research-based foundation in learning to read by using a set curriculum, training teachers in diagnostics and assessment, and emphasizing professional development in order to reach all learners and prevent struggling readers later.

Open Court Reading (OCR) is a phonic-based K-3 curriculum. It includes age-appropriate materials for students, training in pedagogy for teachers, and workshops for professional development of teachers. The OCR curriculum includes three components: Foundational Skills, Reading and Responding, and Language Arts.

For more information visit the factsheet

Strong African American Families – Teen

A family-centered group preventive intervention for black teens living in rural communities entering high school to prevent conduct problems, substance use, and depressive symptoms, and promote protective sexual behavior efficacy.

The Strong African American Families-Teen (SAAF-T) intervention is a preventive intervention for African-American students living in rural communities entering high school that integrates individual youth skills building, parenting skills training, and family interaction training. SAAF-T involves five group sessions using DVDs where narrators address specific content and actors present family scenarios depicting program-targeted interactions and behaviors. Each meeting includes separate one-hour concurrent training for caregivers and youth, followed by a one-hour conjoint session during which families practice the skills they learned in their separate sessions. The program provides parents and youth with skills that nurture adolescent self-regulation, achievement orientation, and negative attitudes toward substance use and other risk behaviors. One of the units involves a focus on sexual health. The program is interactive involving role-playing activities, guided discussions, and question answering.

For more information visit the factsheet

Nuffield Early Language Intervention

An oral language program to improve children’s vocabulary, narrative skills, active listening, and confidence in independent speaking.

Nuffield Early Language Intervention is a 30-week language intervention program delivered in the final term in Nursery school (ages 3-4) and the first two terms in Reception class (age 5). The program comprises activities targeting spoken language skills for the first 20 weeks, supplemented for the final 10 weeks with training in two critical components of the alphabetic principle, letter-sound knowledge and phoneme awareness. A second 20-week version begins upon entry into primary school, rather than beginning in preschool.

For more information visit the factsheet

Maryland Ignition Interlock License Restriction (Policy)

A statewide license restriction program for drivers with multiple alcohol-related traffic offenses to reduce alcohol-impaired driving recidivism.

The use of ignition interlock license restrictions requires those with previous alcohol-related driving offenses to pass a breath analyzer test of blood alcohol levels before starting a vehicle. The program further requires that drivers who are applying for reinstatement of their driving licenses install the ignition interlock system in their vehicle and continue to use it for two years before they are eligible for reinstatement.

Note: The State of Maryland evaluated the effects of interlock installation in two studies. Both were RCTs and carefully conducted. One involved one year of installation and one study two years. Both found large reductions during installation. The one-year study did not show sustained effects, while the two-year study did. Thus, Blueprints is certifying only the two-year study.

For more information visit the factsheet

EAAA (Enhanced Assess, Acknowledge, Act) Sexual Assault Resistance Education

A four-unit program to help first-year college women resist acquaintance sexual assault by providing them with information and resistance training.

The sexual assault resistance program is designed to help first-year university women resist acquaintance sexual assault. The program consists of four 3-hour units that involve information-providing games, mini-lectures, facilitated discussion, and application and practice activities. Participants can attend group sessions for all the units in one weekend (two units each day) or for one unit per week for 4 weeks.

For more information visit the factsheet

Youth Villages YVLifeSet

A community-based program that assists young people with histories of foster care or juvenile justice involvement in making a successful transition to adulthood by providing intensive, individualized, and clinically focused case management, support, and counseling.

YVLifeSet, formerly known as Transitional Living, which is operated by the social services organization Youth Villages, is an independent living program for youth in need (e.g., transitioning from foster care or juvenile justice custody). The program lasts 9 months for most youth who successfully complete the program and involves intensive, individualized, and clinically focused case management, support, and counseling. At the entrance, each person receives an assessment and individualized treatment plan. The bulk of the services are then provided during hour-long, weekly sessions with a case manager, who typically serves only eight youth at a time.

For more information visit the factsheet