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Promising Program Seal

Red Light, Purple Light!: A Self-Regulation Intervention

Blueprints Program Rating: Promising

A preschool-based program intended to improve behavioral aspects of self-regulation in children through circle time games that target attention, working memory, and inhibitory control.

Program Outcomes

  • Academic Performance
  • Cognitive Development
  • School Readiness

Program Type

  • Early Childhood Education

Program Setting

  • School

Continuum of Intervention

  • Universal Prevention (Entire Population)

Age

  • Early Childhood (3-4) - Preschool

Gender

  • Male and Female

Race/Ethnicity

  • All Race/Ethnicity

Endorsements

  • Blueprints: Promising

Program Information Contact

Megan McClelland, Ph.D.
Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families
125 Hallie E. Ford Center
263 SW Campus Way
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331
Phone: 541-737-9225
Email: megan.mcclelland@oregonstate.edu
Wesite: health.oregonstate.edu/labs/kreadiness

Program Developer/Owner

  • Megan McClelland, Ph.D.
  • Oregon State University

Brief Description of the Program

Red Light, Purple Light! consists of circle time games played over an 8-week period and occurring twice per week during approximately 15 to 20-minute sessions that focus on improving three components of executive function: working memory, attentional shifting, and inhibitory control. These games allow children to practice self-regulation skills in group settings.

See: Full Description

Outcomes

Tominey and McClelland (2011) found that children in the intervention group, relative to the control group, showed significantly greater improvements in:

  • Letter-word identification

Schmitt et al. (2015) reported that children in the intervention condition, relative to children in the control condition, showed significantly greater improvements in:

  • Behavioral self-regulation
  • Cognitive and attentional flexibility

Race/Ethnicity/Gender Details

The program targets all groups but has been tested in predominantly low-income samples. Schmitt et al. (2015) found that Spanish-speaking English language learners showed significantly greater improvements in math scores in the intervention condition than English speakers in the intervention.

Training and Technical Assistance

The in-person training consists of 2 trainers and a 3-hour workshop for up to 30 early childhood practitioners. Upon completion of the training, participants will receive a certificate for 3 hours of professional development training from Oregon State University. This course qualifies as a Set 2 training with the Oregon Registry (ORO) and can be applied to ORO Core Knowledge categories: Understanding & Guiding Behavior (UGB) and Human Growth and Development (HGD). In addition, this course aligns with OPEC Parenting Educator Core Knowledge & Skills category: Human Growth & Development.

Live training of the intervention is also accessible through online platforms such as WebEx or Skype for a fee.

A self-paced training is also available online through PACE (Professional and Continuing Education), an Oregon State University website (https://pace.oregonstate.edu/catalog/red-light-purple-light-self-regulation-intervention-program). Upon completion of the self-paced course, participants will receive a certificate for 6 hours of professional development training from Oregon State University. This course qualifies as a Set 1 training with the Oregon Registry (ORO) and can be applied to ORO Core Knowledge categories: Understanding & Guiding Behavior (UGB) and Learning Environments and Curriculum (LEC). In addition, this course aligns with OPEC Parenting Educator Core Knowledge & Skills category: Human Growth & Development.

Brief Evaluation Methodology

Tominey & McClelland (2011) evaluated the program in a randomized controlled trial (N = 65) in two preschools in Oregon. They measured self-regulation and academic outcomes in a pretest at the fall of the final year of preschool before kindergarten and in a posttest at the spring of that school year.

Schmitt et al. (2015) evaluated the program in a randomized controlled trial (N = 276) of children enrolled in preschool through the Head Start program in the Pacific Northwest. The study randomized 14 classrooms to intervention and control conditions. Outcomes were measured at the fall of the final year of preschool before kindergarten and in a posttest at the spring of that school year. The measures included indicators of self-regulation and academics.