Issue No. 18


Welcome to the Blueprints Bulletin



Leadership Letter: 

We are excited to share with you an important milestone Blueprints recently reached. But first, a quick summary of our history will help frame the discussion.
 
Blueprints History

The Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development mission is to provide a comprehensive registry of scientifically proven and scalable interventions that prevent or reduce the likelihood of antisocial behavior and promote a healthy course of youth development and adult maturity. Those interventions are rated as either Promising or Model/Model Plus.
 
Originally started as Blueprints for Violence Prevention, Blueprints was one of the earliest efforts to establish a clear scientific standard for evaluating the evidence of an intervention’s effectiveness, implementing a rigorous expert review process and certifying those interventions that met this standard. Launched in 1996 by internationally renowned researcher Dr. Delbert S. Elliott (who also founded the Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence in 1992), the early years of Blueprints focused on identifying programs that were effective in addressing violence and drug use outcomes. Since its inception, Blueprints has expanded its scope to include mental and physical health, self-regulation, educational achievement, and other positive developmental outcomes.

Celebrating an Important Milestone: 100 Certified Interventions!

In August 2021, Blueprints reached an important milestone by certifying its 100th intervention!
 
Of these, 18 are rated Model/Model Plus and 82 are Promising.
 
The Blueprints website provides an interactive search feature to identify Blueprints-certified interventions based on specific criteria that allows users to browse through a wide range of interventions that match those criteria.
 
Model and Model Plus interventions are listed separately from Promising interventions.
 
This is because Model and Model Plus interventions have demonstrated efficacy for changing outcomes over time and are recommended by Blueprints for large-scale implementation.
 
Promising interventions show promise of efficacy but require follow-up research before being recommended for large-scale adoption.
 

How does an Intervention receive a Rating of Model or Model Plus?

The Blueprints registry standard for a Model rating requires: 

  1. A theoretical rationale/logic model
  2. One or more high quality randomized control trials
  3. An experimental replication
  4. Sustainability of effects for at least one-year post intervention
  5. No evidence of negative or harmful effects
  6. The organizational capacity to provide materials, training, and information for new users to adopt and implement the model intervention with fidelity

Blueprints also has a Model Plus rating, which requires at least one trial by an evaluation team independent of the program developer and his or her colleagues. In sum, the logic is that to consider any program as ready to be relied on in practice or for scaling up, there should be a clearly specified theoretical rationale, reliable evidence of positive, sustained impact based on a sound experimental research design, and at least one replication of positive findings.
 
A high-quality quasi-experimental design (QED) can meet Blueprints standards, but to earn a Model or Model Plus rating, effective interventions must have demonstrated positive effects in at least one high-quality RCT.
 
The Blueprints website provides more information about our standards and review process.

Testing Promising Interventions for Scale-up
 
While most certified interventions listed on the Blueprints website are rated Promising (82 out of 100), several are currently being tested for replication.
 
Under the Research Grants Focused on Systematic Replication (84.305R) competition, the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), which is the research arm of the US Department of Education, will support systematic replication studies of interventions that have produced beneficial effects on education outcomes in one or more rigorous causal-impact studies. We are aware of two replications of Blueprints Promising programs that IES is currently funding:

  • Targeted Reading Instruction (TRI, formerly called Targeted Reading Intervention) is a teacher professional development program designed to help classroom teachers acquire key diagnostic reading instruction strategies differentiated to meet the exact needs of individual students who are struggling with early reading. Blueprints certified the program based on an RCT conducted by Amendum et al. (2011). Dr. Robin Wisniewski from RTI International received a 5-year grant (07/01/2021 – 06/30/2026) that will follow first grade students and teachers for an additional 2 years beyond the intervention to test TRI’s long-term impacts on reading achievement.
  • Whole Number Foundations Level K (Roots) is a 50-session small group mathematics intervention delivered as a pull-out program during the regular school day. The aim is to help strengthen whole number concepts and operations skills in students at risk for developing long-term mathematics difficulties. Blueprints certified the intervention based on an RCT conducted by Clarke et al. (2016). Dr. Ben Clarke from the University of Oregon received a 5-year grant (07/01/2020 – 06/30/2025) to conduct a replication study of ROOTS for students at risk for mathematics learning disabilities across school types and student populations intentionally selected to differ from previous efficacy studies.

Arnold Ventures, a philanthropy dedicated to tackling some of the most pressing problems in the United States, has provided support for RCTs of programs across the spectrum of social policy whose prior evidence shows potential for sizable effects on education, earnings, crime, and other important outcomes. Not only has Arnold Ventures provided support for the Blueprints registry, but it has also supported replications of several interventions rated as Promising on Blueprints:

  • Big Brothers Big Sisters of America (BBBSA) is a community mentoring program that matches a volunteer adult mentor to an at-risk child or adolescent to delay or reduce antisocial behaviors and improve academic success. The program was certified based on an RCT conducted by Grossman & Tierney (1998). Dr. David DuBois from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Dr. Carla Herrera (an independent consultant) are conducting a multi-site RCT with a sample of 20 BBBSA agencies nationwide (the grant term runs from 2016-2024).
  • Career Academies, which are school-based programs designed to provide students with the credentials and skills needed to make successful transitions to post-secondary education and careers, was certified by Blueprints based on a multi-site RCT conducted in a diverse set of urban and small-city high schools in California, Texas, and several cities on the east coast (Kemple & Snipes, 2000; Kemple, 2004; Kemple & Wilner, 2008). MDRC is conducting a replication of Career Academies in California high schools. The term of the grant is from 2017-2032.
  • Child First, a two-generation home visitation program which works to heal and protect young children and their families from the devastating effects of chronic stress and trauma, was certified based on an RCT conducted by Lowell et al. (2011). With support from Arnold Ventures and The Duke Endowment, MDRC is leading an experimental study that aims to replicate the findings from the earlier study in multiple locations across Connecticut and North Carolina.
  • EAAA (Enhanced Assess, Acknowledge, Act) Sexual Assault Resistance Education is a four-unit program to help first-year college women resist acquaintance sexual assault by providing them with information and resistance training. The intervention was certified based on an RCT conducted at three universities in Canada by Senn et al. (2015). Dr. Koss from the University of Arizona is leading a multi-site RCT that includes a one-year follow-up across five U.S. universities.
  • Rochester Forensic Assertive Community Treatment (R-FACT) is an outpatient treatment program to reduce recidivism and promote recovery among justice-involved adults with a serious mental illness that was certified based on an RCT conducted in New York by Lamberti et al. (2017). The University of Rochester is conducting an RCT to evaluate the R-FACT model in Minnesota. The grant runs from 2018 to 2025.
  • Year Up is a training and internship program that helps young people with limited post-secondary education get high-quality jobs by learning to work with technology, developing employment skills, and obtaining internships. The program was certified based on an RCT conducted by Fein & Hamadyk (2018) in eight sites across the US. Dr. David Fein of Abt Associates is leading long-term follow-ups to two RCTs of adaptations of the Year Up model, and the grant runs from 2019-2022.

Nominate an Intervention
 
If you are aware of an intervention Blueprints has rated as Promising that is being replicated and you would like us to review the study, please send all evaluation articles/papers to: blueprints@colorado.edu.
 
And if you are a funding agency awarding grants to replicate intervention programs designed to promote healthy youth development, please contact us as well. We would be interested in profiling your work and any interventions from the Blueprints registry you are funding to replicate.
 
More information on nominating an intervention for Blueprints review can be found on our website by clicking here.
 
As always, thank you for your continued interest in and support of Blueprints.

Sincerely,


Pamela Buckley, PhD
Principal Investigator
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Pamela.Buckley@Colorado.edu


Karl G. Hill, PhD
Co-Principal Investigator
Chair of the Blueprints Board
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Karl.Hill@Colorado.edu

Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development is hosted by the University of Colorado Boulder, Institute of Behavioral Science, with current support from Arnold Ventures and former funding from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Each intervention included in the Blueprints database has been reviewed carefully by an independent advisory panel that looked at research on the intervention’s impact, practical focus and potential for implementation in public systems.

RCTs Headed by Blueprints Staff (with support from Arnold Ventures):  

  • RCT evaluation of LifeSkills Training to prevent substance abuse in high school students. This project, headed by Drs. Karl Hill and Christine Steeger, will evaluate whether the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) Middle School Program – a Blueprints Model Plus program that has been shown in rigorous evaluations to substantially reduce youth substance use – can produce similar impacts when provided directly to high school students in a more abbreviated and potentially more scalable format. Blueprints PI Dr. Pamela Buckley is also consulting on the project. Click here to read more about the study.
  • RCT evaluation of Functional Family Therapy-Gangs (FFT-G). This study, headed by Dr. David Pyrooz (Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Colorado Boulder) and Blueprints PI Dr. Pamela Buckley, is an RCT of Functional Family Therapy–Gangs (FFT–G), a therapeutic intervention for justice-involved youth and their families. A previous, well-conducted RCT of FFT-G (i.e., certified by Blueprints) with a sample of 129 juveniles on probation and at risk of gang involvement in Philadelphia found that FFT–G led to statistically significant reductions in the percent of youth with drug charges and the percent of youth adjudicated for any offense during the 18-month period following random assignment (Gottfredson et al., 2018). Under this current project, the researchers will replicate FFT–G in two judicial districts in the Denver, CO area with a sample of 400 juveniles on probation determined to be gang-embedded. Click here to read more about the study. 

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© 2021 Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development, Regents of the University of Colorado. All rights reserved. 

Our mailing address is:
University of Colorado Boulder | Institute of Behavioral Science
483 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309


Issue No. 17




Announcement: 

We are excited to announce that Dr. Pamela Buckley is the new Principal Investigator (PI) of Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development. Dr. Buckley joined the Blueprints team in 2016 and has been serving as Co-PI and Director. Dr. Karl Hill is still involved in the vision and scientific integrity of Blueprints and will assume the role of Co-PI and will remain Chair of the Blueprints Advisory Board. Read more about Drs. Buckley and Hill’s experience here.

Leadership Letter: 

This newsletter features results from an online survey conducted in collaboration with our friends at Evidence-Based Associates on Model/Model Plus and Promising Programs’ COVID-19 (COVID) response.
 
In May 2020, Blueprints self-funded a survey that was administered to contacts listed for the Blueprints certified programs on how evidence-based interventions had responded to, and begun to plan for, the aftermath of the COVID pandemic. The 2020 survey contained eight questions and 58 of the 94 programs surveyed responded, for a 62 percent response rate. 
 
This one-year follow-up, administered between May and June 2021, had a 58% response rate (57 of the 99 certified programs responded).
 
Results show most programs have experienced a small (or no) impact in delivering services as a direct result of COVID. However, a wide range of modifications to service delivery and implementation strategies were reported – findings that remained relatively stable over time.

Go here to review the May 2021 findings. 
 
Impact of COVID-19 on dissemination/implementation 

Most programs reported either no significant impact in service delivery from COVID, or a small impact causing some difficulties in maintaining dissemination but overall stability. In addition, more than one-quarter reported a positive impact, with COVID providing new opportunities for development. There was, however, a small percentage of programs that experienced a great impact, leading to discontinuation or serious difficulties in sustaining dissemination of their Blueprints-certified program.
 

Status of the dissemination/implementation 

The data show the majority of programs that completed our survey had received requests for changes to the delivery modality and training/support of their intervention. These findings were relatively consistent across the initial (May 2020) and follow-up (May 2021) surveys. As of May 2020, just under half reported experiencing new requests for the adoption of their model – a number that increased by ten percentage points, as measured by the May 2021 responses. Meanwhile, none had discontinued implementation in the wake of COVID as of May 2020 (a percentage that slightly increased in May 2021), but some reported they temporarily suspended their program (a percentage that slightly decreased from the initial to the follow-up survey).
 

Modifications to service delivery 

We conducted our May 2020 survey as many states were experiencing varying levels of stay-at-home orders, schools had been abruptly closed, and most business and childcare facilities were either shut down or beginning to phase in opening plans. As a result, programs were quickly faced with important decisions to ensure the safe continuity of programming while following public health guidelines. Just under one-quarter had not modified the intervention or its delivery due to COVID at the time of our May 2020 survey. The majority, however, provided online resources, turned to tele-sessions and/or video conferencing, and/or offered online training or lessons to support service delivery. A small percentage started a blog as a forum for conversation.
 
By May 2021, as the United States and some countries around the world had begun to ease restrictions with the availability of the COVID-19 vaccine, most programs continued to modify their service delivery by providing online resources and training and turning to tele-sessions/video conferencing – however, these numbers consistently increased by roughly 10 percentage points. Meanwhile, those blogging to offer a forum for conversation remained a small percentage (and this number dropped in half from May 2020 to May 2021).
 
In a new question posed with the follow-up survey, we found that an overwhelming majority had implemented changes to their delivery modality. An even greater majority also had implemented changes to their training/support model. 
 

Impact of modified service delivery on intervention outcomes 

More than one-third of survey respondents are either collecting data or plan to collect data soon on the relationship between modifications made due to COVID and intervention outcomes. This finding was consistent across both surveys. However, just over one-quarter reported in May 2020 that they do not have the resources to collect these data – a number that increased to over one-third in May 2021.
 

What was learned about implementing evidence-based interventions in the context of COVID?

We included an open-ended item asking about lessons learned. Responses are summarized here:

  • The pandemic highlighted the importance of evidence-based programs for youth as needs increased (e.g. increased levels of behavioral and mental health problems) and virtual programming revealed the basic needs of families supporting these youths (e.g. food insecurity, housing, mental and basic health resources).
  • Though developing virtual formats while maintaining fidelity to essential program elements is a lot of work, many programs found various levels of success in providing online/virtual training and/or implementation.
  • There is a need for in-person/online hybrid models. Virtual delivery encounters challenges – e.g., lack of access to or difficulties among participants with incorporating technology, inability to fully conduct interactive program activities, and lower levels of engagement and community-building. Virtual delivery also provides opportunities – e. g., increased engagement by removing barriers to access, reaching a wider audience, and reducing costs of training and delivery.
  • For school-based programs, hard copy curricula must take advantage of the modern classroom and technology so that schools will continue to adopt these programs. Teachers have learned to use technology more effectively, and will continue to use technology platforms to assist with teaching.
  • Flexibility is key for any program.

On March 11, 2020, the coronavirus outbreak was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization. Since then, COVID has touched all aspects of life, from health care and mental health services to education, the environment, and the economy. Blueprints seeks to assist evidence-based interventions in sharing our survey data so that we can work together in supporting families and communities through the complexities of these challenging times. We hope the resources provided by survey respondents and shared in the next section of this newsletter offer helpful tips and ideas.
 
Sincerely,


Pamela Buckley, PhD
Principal Investigator
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Pamela.Buckley@Colorado.edu


Karl G. Hill, PhD
Co-Principal Investigator
Chair of the Blueprints Board
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Karl.Hill@Colorado.edu

Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development is hosted by the University of Colorado Boulder, Institute of Behavioral Science, with current funding from Arnold Ventures and former funding from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Each intervention included in the Blueprints database has been reviewed carefully by an independent advisory panel that looked at research on the intervention’s impact, practical focus and potential for implementation in public systems.

Blueprints News & Resources 
COVID-19 Response Resources
 
In lieu of featuring one Model/Model Plus and one Promising program as we have historically done in each newsletter, below are links to resources provided from survey responses that support evidence-based interventions in offering services during COVID. Several links are updates from what was provided along with results from the May 2020 survey. However, some new links have been added that were reported with the May 2021 follow-up survey results.

Model/Model Plus Programs
 
Body Project (a multi-session group intervention designed to prevent the onset of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating among female high school and college students with body image concerns).
A version for delivery by videoconference rather than in-person is available at no cost by contacting the program developer: Dr. Paul Rohde (paulr@ori.org).
 
Botvin LifeSkills Training (a classroom-based program designed to prevent teenage drug and alcohol abuse, tobacco use, violence and other risk behaviors by teaching students self-management skills, social skills, and drug awareness and resistance skills).
For COVID-related resources, go to:
LST COVID-19 Update
e-Learning Version of LST Middle School 1 (e-LST)
 
Early College High School Model (a high school model designed to increase students’ access to a postsecondary credential, particularly for underrepresented students).
The following guidance on using federal relief money applies to all college programs offered in high school, which includes early colleges: Early College COVID-19 Guidance
 
Multisystemic Therapy® (a juvenile crime prevention program designed to improve the real-world functioning of youth by changing their natural settings – home, school, and neighborhood – in ways that promote prosocial behavior while decreasing antisocial behavior).
For COVID-related resources, go to: MST COVID-19 Statement
 
Nurse-Family Partnership (a nurse home visiting program for first-time pregnant mothers designed to improve prenatal and child rearing practices through the child’s second birthday).
The links below provide COVID-related resources:
NFP Response to COVID-19
NFP COVID-19 Update for Moms
 
Project Towards No Drug Abuse (classroom-based drug prevention program designed for at-risk youth that aims to prevent teen drinking, smoking, marijuana, and other hard drug use).
Online resources can be found here: Transition to Online Implementation
 
ParentCorps (a multi-level intervention designed for pre-kindergarten children living in low-income neighborhoods to create safe, nurturing, and predictable environments at home and in the classroom and improve relationships and communication between parents and teachers).
For COVID-related resources, go to: Tools for Educators and Families
 
Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (a classroom-based social emotional learning program for elementary school students to reduce aggression and behavior problems).
For COVID-related resources, go to:
PATHS Online Free Resources COVID-19
Additional Resources for Remote Teaching
 

Promising Programs
 
Child First (a two-generation home visitation program that provides psycho-therapeutic services and intensive care coordination, while building adult reflective and executive capacity, to prevent or diminish serious emotional disturbance, developmental and learning disabilities, and abuse and neglect among young children).
The links below provide COVID-related resources:
Podcast on how Child First adapted their Home-Visiting Model During the Pandemic
Webinar: Child First Telehealth Case Presentation
Child First COVID-19 Resources
Resources for Home Visiting Models
Practice Spotlight: Dyadic Play via Telehealth
Practice Spotlight: Creative Ways to Engage Families
 
The Good Behavior Game (classroom management approach that rewards children for displaying appropriate on-task behaviors during instructional times).
For COVID-related resources, go to: How Positive Reinforcement Can Keep Students Engaged in a Virtual Setting
 
Head Start REDI (an enrichment program for low-income preschoolers and their families that supplements the Head Start preschool program).
Free online training and coaching modules (small charge to get credits for completing the modules):
Better Kid Care
 
Incredible Years®

  1. Parent (a group-based program that strengthens parent competencies to promote young children’s social, emotional, and academic competence and prevent the development of conduct problems).
  2. Teacher Classroom Management (a program that provides teachers of children ages 3-8 years with classroom management strategies to manage difficult behavior while promoting social, emotional, and academic competence).
  3. Child Treatment (a child treatment program used by counselors and therapists to treat children ages 3-8 years with conduct problems, ADHD, and internalizing problems).

For COVID-related resources, go to each of these links: 1) Incredible Years Online Workshops and Video Streaming; and 2) Incredible Years Resources for Group Leaders 
 
Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (a program designed for children and their parents that focuses on decreasing child behavior problems, increasing positive parent behaviors, and improving the quality of the parent-child relationship).
For COVID-related resources, go to:
PCIT COVID-19 Therapist and Trainer Resources
Resources for Parents
 
Promoting First Relationships (a training program for promoting secure and healthy relationships between caregivers and young children birth to three years of age).
The links below provide COVID-related telehealth resources:
Department of Health and Human Services
Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health
ACEs Connection
 
Promoting Health Among Teens! (Abstinence Only) (a program to to reduce risky sexual behavior for African American youth by providing information on sexual risks and helping teens build negotiation, refusal, and problem solving skills for practicing abstinence).
For COVID-related resources, go to: Virtual Training of Educators
 
SPORT and InShape Prevention Plus Wellness (a health promotion program that highlights the positive image benefits of an active lifestyle to reduce the use of alcohol, tobacco, and drug use by high school students).
For COVID-related resources, go to: Prevention Plus Wellness Remote Implementation
 
Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Youth 10-14 (a group program that aims to promote good parenting skills and positive family relationships; reduce aggressive, hostile behavior, and substance abuse in adolescence; and improve family relationships).
For COVID-related resources, go to: Strengthening Families COVID-19 Resources
 
Tools of the Mind (an early childhood program designed to promote academic learning and prosocial behaviors by supporting the development of executive function and other regulation-related skills).
The links below provide COVID-related resources:
Tools COVID-19 Resource Center
Tools @ Home for Parents
Preparing for Virtual Workshops & Technical Assistance (TA)
 
Triple P System (a public health approach to reach all parents in a community to enhance parental competence and prevent or alter dysfunctional parenting practices, thereby reducing family risk factors both for child maltreatment and for children’s behavioral and emotional problems.)
Triple P America delivered several webinars on delivering Triple P remotely and using Triple P Online. Recordings of these webinars are available by emailing: contact.us@triplep.net. Also, these links provide free resources developed in response to COVID:
Parenting During COVID-19
COVID-19 Module
 
Year Up (a training and internship program that helps young people with limited post-secondary education get high-quality jobs by learning to work with technology, developing employment skills, and obtaining internships).
Online COVID-related articles:
Forbes: Year Up’s Shift To Virtual Operations
New York Times: Gaining Skills Virtually to Close the Inequality Gap

Blueprints Virtual Talks 

  • Drs. Pamela Buckley and Karl Hill gave a talk at the Prevention Science Methodology Group Virtual Grand Rounds on Addressing Health Equity and Social Justice within Prevention Registries. The webinar first presented an overview of the Blueprints registry, and then discussed concerns regarding adaptation/cultural relevance that registry staff and users encounter with increasing frequency. Next, an overview of a recently funded project was presented that begins to address these concerns within Blueprints. While lack of representation of youth of color in health-related research studies has been well-documented, a critical evaluation of this omission has not been undertaken to substantiate this claim. This new project involves reviewing the scope of extant research on representation of ethnic minority groups in preventive intervention research, thus serving as a vehicle for decision-making regarding the generalizability of evidence-based interventions listed on clearinghouse websites (such as Blueprints). Go here to download slides and view the webinar.
  • Dr. Pamela Buckley participated in a panel at the 36th Annual San Diego International Conference on Child and Family Maltreatment presented by the Chadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego. The virtual conference was designed to equip and support professionals in the child welfare field to effectively identify and address child maltreatment, trauma, and violence. The presentation, titled Child Welfare And Evidence Registries: Comparative Analysis, explained the Title IV-E Prevention Services Clearinghouse, which was developed for the Family First Prevention Services Act, and compared it to the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse (CEBC) and Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development. The purpose was to discuss how registries can inform decision-making in the adoption of evidence-based interventions specific to the child welfare system. The panel discussion can be viewed online by clicking here.

Blueprints Publications

In case you have missed them, here are a few papers published by staff and Advisory Board members of the Blueprints team:

  • Combs et al. (2021) conducted a study that explored whether teachers trained online have similar levels of fidelity of implementation compared to teachers trained in-person on the Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST) middle school program (a Blueprints Model Plus intervention). Findings indicate that online training builds competencies important for school-based EBI implementation, while also highlighting potential shortcomings related to quality of delivery. The authors conclude that ensuring the inclusion of experiential learning activities (e.g., practice delivering content, receiving feedback on delivery) may be key to quality of delivery as online trainings for facilitators of school-based EBIs evolve. Go here to read the full study (published as an open-access article).
  • Blueprints promotes only those interventions with the strongest scientific support. Blueprints staff recently published a paper that describes the common methodological problems in randomized control trials that prevent interventions from being certified by Blueprints (Steeger, Buckley et al., 2021). Read more here.
  • Blueprints staff and board members published a paper that examined the prevalence of transparent research practices for studies reviewed by Blueprints from 2018 through 2019 (Buckley et al., 2021). Specifically, the study examined the rate of 1) public availability of data, code and research materials used to conduct confirmatory research, 2) prospective registration or registration before data analysis, and 3) discrepancies between confirmatory research reported in the trial registration (i.e., registered primary outcomes) and those included in articles (i.e., published primary outcomes). Findings suggest that: 1) preventive intervention research needs to be more transparent, and 2) since clearinghouses rely on robust findings to make well-informed decisions and researchers are incentivized to meet clearinghouse standards, clearinghouses should consider policies that encourage transparency to improve the credibility of evidence-based interventions. Go here to read the paper. The preprint (full copy report) can be read by clicking here.
  • A full list of Blueprints’ publications can be found on our website by clicking here.

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© 2021 Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development, Regents of the University of Colorado. All rights reserved. 

Our mailing address is:
University of Colorado Boulder | Institute of Behavioral Science
483 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309


Issue No. 16




Leadership Letter: 

The Importance of Dissemination Readiness  
 
Did you know that Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development lists dissemination readiness as one of four formal requirements for meeting its standard of evidence? This means that, before an intervention is listed as Blueprints-certified, we verify that there is a clear description of its activities and explicit implementation materials or procedures. Blueprints’ other standards are intervention specificity, evaluation quality, and intervention impact; the dissemination readiness dimension is evaluated only for interventions that satisfy these first three requirements.
 
According to Blueprints’ dissemination readiness criteria, well-evaluated interventions must have materials or instructions that specify the intervention content and guide the implementation of the intervention, such as manuals, training, and technical assistance, and (where available) specify costs associated with implementation (such as those for start-up, implementation, and support) and staff resources (for example, staff qualifications and time commitments) needed to deliver the intervention with fidelity.
 
Thus, interventions that meet the Blueprints standard of evidence must be available for use.
 
Blueprints certifies programs that meet all four of its standards (intervention specificity, evaluation quality, intervention impact, and dissemination readiness) as Model/Model Plus or Promising.
 
We recently conducted a study to determine whether online clearinghouses rate and provide information about the degree to which well-evaluated programs can be well-implemented. Our goal was to fill a knowledge gap by examining if and how the dissemination readiness of evidence-based interventions has been defined, evaluated, and communicated to potential users. To do so, we compared 11 different U.S.-based online private and federally funded clearinghouses on (1) the degree to which they use dissemination readiness as a criterion for inclusion/exclusion of evidence-based interventions, and (2) the extent of information and support they provide about dissemination readiness to facilitate real-world implementation.
 
We found wide variability, with few having standards about dissemination readiness or making information about implementation of evidence-based interventions easily accessible to users. Across the 11 clearinghouses we examined, only Blueprints has both a requirement for dissemination readiness and provides relatively complete information relevant to dissemination readiness.
 
Our findings indicate the need for online clearinghouses to (1) do more to assess dissemination readiness and (2) offer more complete information on dissemination readiness and implementation support to users. Doing so, however, requires a commitment from funders (who have finite resources) to invest in the dissemination readiness of evidence-based interventions. That is, funding is needed for developers to provide robust dissemination materials and time is needed for clearinghouse staff to collect this information. We therefore want to recognize the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which provided funding to Blueprints to develop the tools we currently use to gather information on dissemination readiness and historically paid contractors to collect this information as part of its Evidence2Success initiative.
 

Why Conduct this Study?
 
This is important work to share because we want to convey to users our process for listing on our website interventions rated as Model/Model Plus or Promising. If an intervention does not meet most or any of Blueprints dissemination readiness criteria but has a high-quality design, that intervention will receive a “not dissemination ready” rating – meaning it has met criteria for evaluation quality (as determined by the Blueprints Advisory Board) but has not yet met the dissemination readiness criteria. This could be one reason why certain interventions are identified with an effective rating on other clearinghouses but not listed as a Blueprints-certified intervention on our website.
 
If you are interested in reading more, the full study was published in Evaluation Review, a peer-reviewed academic journal that aims to advance the practice of evaluation and to publish the results of high-quality evaluations. The abstract and full text have been published as an open-access article and can be accessed through the publications page of the Blueprints website as well as on PubMed.gov.
 

Recognizing These Challenging Times 
 
In closing, we cannot ignore that many communities, families, and individuals continue to struggle. With a global pandemic, protests and riots in parts of the United States and world, divisive elections, online learning and remote work, and – for some parts of the US – extreme weather conditions, this past year will go down as one of the most devastating in modern history. As we all continue to cope with and adapt to these realities, Blueprints will persist in working on our mission of promoting effective preventive interventions and helping governmental agencies, foundations, and practitioners use strong evidence to make informed decisions when identifying interventions that provide a high probability of success when taken to scale in communities. It is this commitment that helps us persevere through these challenging times. We thank each one of you for your part in our community and for your involvement in this important effort.
 
Sincerely,


Pamela Buckley, PhD
Director and Co-Principal Investigator
Blueprints Initiative
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Pamela.Buckley@Colorado.edu


Karl G. Hill, PhD
Principal Investigator
Blueprints Initiative
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Karl.Hill@Colorado.edu

Reference: Buckley, P. R., Fagan, A., Pampel, F. & Hill, K. (2020). Making evidence-based interventions relevant for users: A comparison of requirements for dissemination readiness across program registries. Evaluation Review, 44(1), 51-83. https://doi.org/10.1177/0193841X20933776

Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development is hosted by the University of Colorado Boulder, Institute of Behavioral Science, with current funding from Arnold Ventures and former funding from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Each intervention included in the Blueprints database has been reviewed carefully by an independent advisory panel that looked at research on the intervention’s impact, practical focus and potential for implementation in public systems.

Featured Model Plus Program
GenerationPMTO

Blueprints Certified: 2020 (Moved from Model to Model Plus)

Ages Served: Early Childhood (3-4) – Preschool, Late Childhood (5-11) – K/Elementary, Early Adolescence (12-14) – Middle School, Late Adolescence (15-18) – High School 

Program Outcomes: Antisocial-aggressive Behavior, Conduct Problems, Delinquency and Criminal Behavior, Emotion Regulation, Externalizing, Internalizing, Positive Social/Prosocial Behavior.  
 

A family training program that aims to teach effective family management skills in order to reduce antisocial and problematic behavior in children through trainings implemented in a variety of formats and settings.

Learn more > >

Featured Promising Program
Bounce Back

Blueprints Certified: 2020

Ages Served: Late Childhood (5-11) – K/Elementary

Program Outcomes: Anxiety, Emotional Regulation, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).
 

Bounce Back is a school- and group-based program designed to improve symptoms of posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety among children with posttraumatic stress symptoms.

Learn more > >

Blueprints Interventions in the News
In case you have missed them, here are a few newspaper articles and web postings that feature activities of some Blueprints-certified interventions: 
  • Child First (a Blueprints promising program) is a home visitation program that works to heal and protect young children and their families from the devastating effects of chronic stress and trauma. With a $700,000 grant awarded in 2018, The Duke Endowment is supporting a randomized controlled trial of Child First in eastern North Carolina. Arnold Ventures is providing funding to study Child First in Connecticut. MDRC is conducting research in both states and Meghan McCormick (an MDRC research associate) explains more about evaluating Child First and about finding a silver lining in COVID-19. Go here to read the full interview.
  • Big Brothers Big Sisters of America (BBBSA) is a Blueprints promising program that matches an adult volunteer mentor with an at-risk child or adolescent to delay or reduce antisocial behaviors and improve academic success. Emily Johnson, CEO of BBBS of Southwest Idaho, says their chapter is matching kids with adult mentors based on compatibility. Go here to learn more about the procedures BBBS of Southwest Idaho is following to help mentors and mentees interact while ensuring the safe continuity of programming during the COVID-19 outbreak.
  • The Communities That Care (CTC) chapter of West Chester (a township in Pennsylvania) is providing resources for parents to help them deal with the challenges the COVID-19 pandemic has presented. CTC (a Blueprints promising program) is a prevention system designed to reduce levels of adolescent delinquency and substance use through the selection and use of effective preventative interventions. The CTC chapter of West Chester has dedicated its 2021 Parent Speaker series to the topic of emotional health to keep parents connected, and to offer concrete solutions concerning today’s parenting challenges. To learn more about the speaker series and the efforts being made by the West Chester CTC chapter, go here.
  • The Pace Center for Girls in Alachua (a county in Florida) recently received a $5,000 Golden Grant award from the North Florida McDonald’s Operators Association. Pace Center for Girls (a Blueprints Promising program) is a set of gender-responsive prevention and early intervention programs for girls with multiple risk factors for juvenile justice system involvement, which uses a holistic approach to re-engage girls with learning, improve academic performance, and address underlying trauma. Natalya Bannister, the executive director for Pace Center for Girls Alachua, says the program was vulnerable due to the COVID-19 pandemic and that the funds will go towards supporting their reading initiatives. Go here to learn more.

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© 2021 Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development, Regents of the University of Colorado. All rights reserved. 

Our mailing address is:
University of Colorado Boulder | Institute of Behavioral Science
483 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309


Issue No. 15


Welcome to the Blueprints Bulletin



Leadership Letter: 

On March 11, 2020, the coronavirus outbreak was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization. As noted in our last newsletter and in publications and experiences around the world, COVID-19 has touched all aspects of life and caused many disruptions, including the cancellation of the 2020 Blueprints Conference (which is held every other year and brings together evidence-based program professionals and advocates from around the world). While we continue to navigate the uncertainty of planning large events during these troubling times, we remain committed to identifying interventions that have the highest standards for promoting education, good behavior, emotional well-being, physical health, and positive relationships.

A debate on evidence-based approaches for guiding juvenile justice programming
 

One of the tracks planned for the 2020 Blueprints Conference was titled “successful scale-up frameworks,” in which sessions would focus on broad dissemination to ensure the impact of Blueprints-certified interventions on a large scale. Though unable to host these conversations to date, this newsletter summarizes a related debate featured in a recent issue of Criminology & Public Policy (CPP). As CPP is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering criminology and its implications for public policy, the debate focuses on evidence-based approaches for guiding juvenile justice programming and assessing the system-level effects on recidivism as reforms are implemented and evidence-based interventions are adopted.
 
Featured first is an essay led by Blueprints founder and board member, Dr. Del Elliott, in which several members of the Blueprints leadership team serve as co-authors. Titled “Evidence-based juvenile justice programs and practices: A critical review,” the full-text article can be read here: Elliott, Buckley, Gottfredson, Hawkins & Tolan (2020). The focus is on interventions rated as “model,” an evidence-level that Blueprints specifically notes is required for scale-up. The Blueprints model standard requires: 1) documentation of the intervention activities targeting risk or protective factors theoretically linked to change a behavioral youth outcome, 2) one or more high quality randomized controlled designs (RCTs), 3) an experimental replication, 4) sustainability of effects for a minimum of one year post intervention, 5) no evidence from high-quality evaluations of harmful effects, and 6) the organizational capacity to provide information for potential users to adopt and implement the intervention with fidelity. While less consensus exists regarding the definition of evidence-based practices, they typically involve generic types of strategies often informed by meta-analysis that share core components but do not involve the same detailed package of prescribed activities as with Blueprints-rated “model” interventions. Elliott and colleagues contend that we should invest more heavily in model interventions and treat generic practices as a complementary approach in need of further rigorous evaluation.
 
Dr. Mark Lipsey of Vanderbilt University authored the second essay on this debate. Titled “Effective use of the large body of research on the effectiveness of programs for juvenile offenders and the failure of the model programs approach”, the abstract is located here (Lipsey, 2020) and the full-text article can be read by paid subscribers to CPP. In his essay, Lipsey explains the development of the Standardized Program Evaluation Protocol (SPEP), which he promotes as an evidence-based practice intervention. Lipsey describes SPEP as an assessment based on a meta-analysis he conducted in 2009 involving four program characteristics treated as core components in an evidence-based intervention that are predictive of favorable recidivism effects. SPEP is offered to juvenile justice systems as a set of practice guidelines for improving their programming, with the claim that increasing compliance levels across these four characteristics (i.e., their SPEP score) will increase effectiveness.
 
Both essays agree that juvenile justice interventions should be supported by credible evidence of effectiveness.
 
The third essay is written by Dr. Brandon Welsh of Northeastern University, who cites that a key criticism of evidence-based interventions (whether they are model programs or generic practices) is the limited research demonstrating their ability to achieve population impacts. In this paper, titled “The case for rigorous comparative research and population impacts in a new era of evidence-based interventions for juvenile offenders” (the abstract can be read here), Dr. Welsh notes that greater attention to both approaches is necessary in order to have lasting impacts in reducing recidivism rates. He also cites the importance of frameworks such as the Communities That Care (CTC) model, which aims to reduce delinquency and later offending by implementing particular interventions—from a menu of strategies—that have demonstrated effectiveness in reducing risk factors and enhancing protective factors. Though not mentioned in Welsh’s essay, CTC is rated as “promising” on the Blueprints registry (click here to review the Blueprints write-up of CTC).
 
We hope that you enjoy this lively debate. We also wish you safety and health during this holiday season.
 
Sincerely,


Pamela Buckley, PhD
Director and Co-Principal Investigator
Blueprints Initiative
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Pamela.Buckley@Colorado.edu


Karl G. Hill, PhD
Principal Investigator
Blueprints Initiative
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Karl.Hill@Colorado.edu

Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development is hosted by the University of Colorado Boulder, Institute of Behavioral Science, with current funding from Arnold Ventures and former funding from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Each intervention included in the Blueprints database has been reviewed carefully by an independent advisory panel that looked at research on the intervention’s impact, practical focus, and potential for implementation in public systems.

Blueprints Year in Review 
We accomplished a lot in 2020!
(1) We are proud to report that we reviewed 51 unique interventions, 142 individual articles or reports and certified seven interventions. Many of the articles we reviewed in 2020 came to our attention through published scientific studies that we found in comprehensive searches of the evaluation literature, databases, and journals. In addition, we searched blogs, the internet, and other registries to locate evaluation studies. We also reviewed interventions by a request from developers or evaluators (click here to nominate an intervention). (2) We expanded our social media presence from Facebook and Twitter to also include Instagram. (3) We planned two meetings for the Blueprints Advisory Board, a distinguished panel of methodological experts with a variety of content expertise (one Board meeting in 2020 was canceled due to COVID-19). (4) We launched features on our website to (a) assist with downloading and saving searches on Blueprints-certified interventions, and (b) allow users to export searches of interventions reviewed by Blueprints that did not meet our certification standards (click here). (5) We conducted an online survey in collaboration with our friends at Evidence-Based Associates on Model/Model Plus and Promising Programs’ COVID-19 response (the full survey and aggregated responses can be downloaded by clicking here). (6) We published 2 academic, peer-reviewed papers – one of which is highlighted in this newsletter (see Blueprints publications listed on our website here). And (7) we planned for the 2020 Blueprints biennial conference (cancelled due to COVID-19). 
 
In addition, members of the Blueprints advisory board accomplished a lot in 2020! (1) Dr. Karl Hill led a webinar titled “Why Use Evidence and Where to Find It: Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development” (hosted by the Northwest Prevention Technology Transfer Center). The webinar discussed the importance of employing evidence and prevention science in substance misuse prevention work. Click here to view the recorded webinar. (2) Dr. Frances Gardner collaborated with the World Health Organization, UNICEF, the Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children, the Internet of Good Things, USAID and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop a website with open-access online parenting resources during COVID-19. Go here to learn more. (3) Dr. Larry Hedges published a working paper with  a colleague from Northwestern University titled “Addressing the Challenges to Educational Research Posed by COVID-19,” which discussed how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the conduct of ongoing research, especially randomized field trials. The paper seeks to identify some of the problems that may arise because of this disruption and identify possible responses to the disruption. Read the full working paper here. (4) Dr. Abigail Fagan was elected to the board of the Society for Prevention Research (SPR), an organization dedicated to conducting and translating prevention research that promotes health and well-being. She will serve a one-year term (June, 2020 through June, 2021) as President-Elect, after which she will serve a two-year term (June, 2021 through June, 2023) as President. (5) Dr. Velma McBride Murry, Dr. Patrick Tolan, and Dr. Abigail Fagan were recognized by SPR for making a significant impact in the field of prevention science. Dr. Murry and Dr. Tolan both received the “Advances in Culture and Diversity in Prevention Science Award” and Dr. Fagan received the “Service to SPR” Award. And (6) Dr. Velma Murry was elected to the National Academy of Medicine, which provides trusted scientific advice.

2020 in Review
By the numbers 

Below is a summary of our year in review.
 
Interventions Reviewed & Certified in the Past Year
 
•  Number of Unique Interventions Reviewed = 51
•  Number of Individuals Articles or Reports Reviewed = 142
•  Number of Interventions Certified = 7
 
Learning Together (Promising)
Added Jan. 9, 2020
Learn more
 
Year Up (Promising)
Added Feb.14, 2020
Learn more
 
Tools of the Mind (Promising)
Added: May 19, 2020
Learn more
 
Bounce Back (Promising)
Added: Jul. 22, 2020
Learn more
 
Pace Center for Girls (Promising)
Added: Sep. 24, 2020
Learn more
 
GenerationPMTO (Moved from Model to Model Plus)
Added: Sep. 24, 2020
Learn more
 
Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (Model Plus)
Added: Dec. 2, 2020
Learn more

Featured Model Program
Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) 

Blueprints Certified: 2020
Ages Served: Early Adulthood (19-22) – The program targets low-income community college students.
Program Outcomes: Academic Performance, Post-secondary Education 

A post-secondary college-based prevention program that aims to address potential barriers to academic success and promote credit accumulation and associate degree completion in college students through comprehensive advisement and career and tutoring services provided by dedicated advisers.

Learn more > >

Featured Promising Program
Pace Center for Girls 

Blueprints Certified: 2020
Ages Served: Early Adolescence (12-14) – Middle School; Late Adolescence (15-18) –  High School 
Program Outcomes: Academic Performance, Truancy – School Attendance 

Pace Center for Girls (Pace) encompasses a set of gender-responsive prevention and early intervention programs and services for girls with multiple risk factors for juvenile justice system involvement including academic failure, chronic truancy, and dropping out of school. 

Learn more > >

Blueprints Interventions in the News
In case you have missed them, here are a few newspaper articles and web postings that feature efforts of some of our Blueprint’s Model/Model Plus and Promising Programs in helping communities facing challenges stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • The Nurse-Family Partnership Program (a Blueprints Model program) continues to help new mothers navigate pregnancy and parenthood amid #COVID19. NFP is a nurse home visiting program for first-time pregnant mothers designed to improve prenatal and child rearing practices through the child’s second birthday. Go here to learn more.
  • Big Brothers Big Sisters of America (BBBSA) is a Blueprints Promising program that matches adult volunteer mentors with an at-risk child or adolescent to reduce antisocial behavior and improve academic success. The CEO of BBBS of East Tennessee says their mission is critical amid #COVID19; a recent news feature reported more than 100 children on their wait list. Learn more here.
  • The Education Policy Institute (EPI) says the learning gap between rich and poor students of primary school age in England has widened for the first time since 2007, suggesting #COVID19 has had a major impact on the education system. To help combat the disruption, the UK Department for Education created a “COVID-19 Catch-Up Premium,” which includes funding for the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (a Blueprints Promising program). Go here to learn more. 

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© 2019 Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development, Regents of the University of Colorado. All rights reserved. 

Our mailing address is:
University of Colorado Boulder | Institute of Behavioral Science
483 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309


Issue No. 14

 


Welcome to the Blueprints Bulletin



Leadership Letter: 

This newsletter features results from an online survey conducted in collaboration with our friends at Evidence-Based Associates on Model/Model Plus and Promising Programs’ COVID-19 response.

Results show a wide range of modifications to service delivery and implementation strategies.

In May and June 2020, Blueprints self-funded a survey conducted with contacts listed for the 17 Model/Model Plus and 77 Promising Programs on how evidence-based interventions have responded to, and begun to plan for, the aftermath of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The survey contained eight questions and 58 of the 94 programs surveyed responded (for a 62 percent response rate). The full survey and aggregated responses can be downloaded by clicking here. Highlights are shared below.

Status of the dissemination/implementation 

The data show the majority of programs that completed our survey have received requests for changes to the delivery modality and training/support of their intervention, and just under half have experienced new requests for the adoption of their intervention model. None, however, discontinued implementation in the wake of COVID-19 but some reported they suspended their program.

Modifications to service delivery 

We conducted our survey as many states were experiencing varying levels of stay-at-home orders, schools had been abruptly closed, and most business and childcare facilities were either shut down or beginning to phase in opening plans. As a result, programs were quickly faced with important decisions to ensure the safe continuity of programming while following public health guidelines. Just under one-quarter had not modified the intervention or its delivery due to COVID at the time of our survey. The majority, however, provided online resources, turned to tele-sessions and/or video conferencing, and/or offered online training or lessons to support service delivery. A small percentage started a blog as a forum for conversation.

Communication of modifications 

Just over half communicated changes to their delivery or services via e-blasts to subscribers. In addition, roughly one-third posted messages on social media and/or their website. A smaller percentage (less than 20 percent) turned to blogging.

Impact of modified service delivery on intervention outcomes 

More than one-third of survey respondents are either collecting data or plan to collect data soon on the relationship between modifications made due to COVID and intervention outcomes. However, just over one-quarter report they do not have the resources to collect these data.

What do programs want to know?

We included an open-ended item asking what questions survey participants have of Blueprints or of other Blueprints-certified interventions. Below are some highlights summarizing responses:

  • Programs want to know what instruments others are using to document changes to their delivery model or implementation due to COVID. 
  • How have others handled shifting or confusing billing issues and agency requirements for telemedicine and/or returning to clinics?  
  • What opportunities exist to better understand and learn from COVID-19 regarding implementation and sustainability?
  • How best can programs engage political and community leaders to understand the importance of implementing evidence-based interventions?
  • Have other programs suspended evaluating their Blueprints program? If so, when are they planning on resuming data collection and how do they plan to continue to collect data?
  • What are some effective strategies programs have figured out in adapting to video meetings for maintaining engagement with children, individuals and/or families (depending on the population targeted for the intervention)?

On March 11, 2020, the coronavirus outbreak was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization. COVID-19 has dramatically changed lives everywhere and touched all aspects of life, from health care and mental health services to education, the environment, and the economy. In this environment of rapidly changing information about the virus, Blueprints seeks to assist evidence-based interventions in sharing our survey data so that we can work together in supporting families and communities through the complexities of this crisis. As we figure out next steps regarding this effort, we encourage others to network and swap ideas. We hope the resources provided by survey respondents and shared in the next section of this newsletter offer helpful tips and ideas.

Wishing you safety and health.

Sincerely,


Pamela Buckley, PhD
Director and Co-Principal Investigator
Blueprints Initiative
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Pamela.Buckley@Colorado.edu


Karl G. Hill, PhD
Principal Investigator
Blueprints Initiative
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Karl.Hill@Colorado.edu

Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development is hosted by the University of Colorado Boulder, Institute of Behavioral Science, with current funding from Arnold Ventures and former funding from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Each intervention included in the Blueprints database has been reviewed carefully by an independent advisory panel that looked at research on the intervention’s impact, practical focus and potential for implementation in public systems.

Blueprints News & Resources
COVID-19 Response Resources 

In lieu of featuring one Model/Model Plus and one Promising program as we have historically done in each newsletter, below are links to resources provided from survey responses that support evidence-based interventions in offering services during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Model/Model Plus Programs
 
Botvin LifeSkills Training (a classroom-based program designed to prevent teenage drug and alcohol abuse, tobacco use, violence and other risk behaviors by teaching students self-management skills, social skills, and drug awareness and resistance skills). For COVID-related resources, go to LST COVID-19 Update
 
Early College High School Model (a high school model designed to increase students’ access to a postsecondary credential, particularly for underrepresented students). The following guidance applies to all dual enrollment opportunities in North Carolina, which includes early colleges: Early College COVID-19 Guidance

Multisystemic Therapy® (a juvenile crime prevention program designed to improve the real-world functioning of youth by changing their natural settings – home, school, and neighborhood – in ways that promote prosocial behavior while decreasing antisocial behavior). For COVID-related resources, go to: MST COVID-19 Statement.

Nurse-Family Partnership (a nurse home visiting program for first-time pregnant mothers designed to improve prenatal and child rearing practices through the child’s second birthday). The links below provide COVID-related resources:

Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (a classroom-based social emotional learning program for elementary school students to reduce aggression and behavior problems).  For COVID-related resources, go to: PATHS Blog COVID-19

Promising Programs 

Child First (a two-generation home visitation program that provides psycho-therapeutic services and intensive care coordination, while building adult reflective and executive capacity, to prevent or diminish serious emotional, developmental and learning disabilities, and abuse and neglect among young children). The links below provide COVID-related resources:

Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (a multi-session group intervention that aims to reduce children’s post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, as well as anxiety and depression resulting from exposure to violence, through child, parent, and teacher educational sessions). For COVID-related resources, go to: CBITS COVID-19 Resources

Communities that Care (a prevention system designed to reduce levels of adolescent delinquency and substance use through the selection and use of effective preventative interventions tailored to a community’s specific profile of risk and protection). For COVID-related resources, go to: CTC Disparities and Prevention during Pandemic

Incredible Years®

  1. Parent (a group-based program that strengthens parent competencies to promote young children’s social, emotional, and academic competence and prevent the development of conduct problems):
  2. Teacher Classroom Management (a program that provides teachers of children ages 3-8 years with classroom management strategies to manage difficult behavior while promoting social, emotional, and academic competence):
  3. Child Treatment (a child treatment program used by counselors and therapists to treat children ages 3-8 years with conduct problems, ADHD, and internalizing problems).   

 For COVID-related resources, go to: Incredible Years Resources for Group Leaders

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (a program designed for children and their parents that focuses on decreasing child behavior problems, increasing positive parent behaviors, and improving the quality of the parent-child relationship). For COVID-related resources, go to: PCIT COVID-19 Therapist and Trainer Resources

Promoting First Relationships (a training program for promoting secure and healthy relationships between caregivers and young children birth to three years of age). The links below provide COVID-related telehealth resources:

SPORT Prevention Plus Wellness (a health promotion program that highlights the positive image benefits of an active lifestyle to reduce the use of alcohol, tobacco and drug use by high school students). For COVID-related resources, go to: Prevention Plus Wellness Remote Implementation.

Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Youth 10-14 (a group program that aims to promote good parenting skills and positive family relationships; reduce aggressive, hostile behavior, and substance abuse in adolescence; and improve family relationships). For COVID-related resources, go to: Strengthening Families COVID-19 Resources

Tools of the Mind (an early childhood program designed to promote academic learning and prosocial behaviors by supporting the development of executive function and other regulation-related skills). The links below provide COVID-related resources:

Blueprints Interventions in the News
In case you’ve missed them, here are a few newspaper articles and web postings that feature some of our Blueprint’s Model and Promising Programs:
  • The New York Times recently published an article discussing Year Up (a Blueprints Promising Program) and the organization’s transition to virtual training. In addition to providing support, Year Up trains young adults in both technical and soft skills. The article discusses how trying to translate life-changing experiences to computer screens and video classes is the lockdown-induced experiment now being conducted by Year Up and other programs designed for disadvantaged Americans. The future of these programs is in doubt at a time when they would seem to be needed more than ever. The forced march online has triggered a drastic rethinking across the education-to-employment field and will most likely bring lasting change — and perhaps open the door to significant expansion. But Year Up and others say they have found that much more of their training can be done effectively online than they expected. Read more here.  
  • The Salt Lake Tribune ran a series of news stories examining how teens in Kearns, Utah (a suburb of Salt Lake City) are coping with stress. This article mentions Blueprints and highlights The Blues Program (a Blueprints Model program), which has been shown to reduce depression and illicit drug use. One student interviewed shared how the program has specifically helped her manage COVID-19 pandemic-related stress and anxiety. The Kearns Evidence2Success Coalition and Salt Lake County Youth Services made it possible for 16 Granite District social workers and counselors to be trained on ME Time (also known as The Blues Program) to support a growing number of teens who report feeling sad or hopeless. Learn more about these community-wide efforts here
  • The East Central Iowa chapter of Big Brothers Big Sisters of America has joined the call for justice and equity amid national protests following the death of George Floyd. According to Big Brothers Big Sisters, more than 50% of the youth served in Cedar Rapids (city in Iowa) and East Central Iowa are black and brown children. Big Brothers Big Sisters of America is a Blueprints Promising program that matches a volunteer adult mentor to an at-risk child or adolescent to delay or reduce antisocial behaviors, improve academic success, and provide social and cultural enrichment. Linda Henecke, President and CEO of the East Central Iowa chapter, issued a statement in support of Black communities. Read the full statement here.  
  • Two Pennsylvania area chapters of Communities That Care (Cheltenham and Norristown Area) are partnering with the Montgomery County Office of Drug and Alcohol and Family Services of Montgomery County to share the “Talk. They Hear You” campaign with their communities. Communities That Care (a Blueprints Promising program) is a prevention system designed to reduce levels of adolescent delinquency and substance use through the selection and use of effective preventative interventions. “Talk. They Hear You” is a national media campaign and resource toolkit created by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) that emphasizes the importance of parents talking to their kids about alcohol and drug use. The campaign offers advice to parents about preparing their children to deal with peer pressure that may lead to alcohol and drug use. Go here to learn more about the campaign. 
  • The Sentinel Newspaper in Carlisle, Pennsylvania features two Blueprints-certified family programs: Strengthening Families and Family Check-up. Strengthening Families is a Blueprints Promising program that aims to promote good parenting skills and positive family relationships, and reduce aggressive behavior and substance use in adolescence. Family Check-Up is a Blueprints Promising program that aims to prevent conduct problems among at-risk toddlers by improving the quality of parenting and increasing and maintaining parents’ use of positive behavior support. Both programs are being provided free of charge using telehealth and online platforms through a grant to families in Cumberland, Perry, and Upper Adams counties. Go here to learn more. 
  • After studies showed that Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) (a Blueprints Model program) positively impacted behavioral and academic outcomes, educators and school board members in Frederick, Maryland are looking to expand the social-emotional learning program and implement it in all pre-k through second grade classrooms this school year. PATHS is a classroom-based enrichment program designed to reduce aggression and behavior problems. Go here to learn more about PATHS implementation in Frederick, MD.

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© 2020 Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development, Regents of the University of Colorado. All rights reserved. 

Our mailing address is:
University of Colorado Boulder | Institute of Behavioral Science
483 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309


Issue No. 13

 


Welcome to the Blueprints Bulletin



Leadership Letter: 

We hope this letter finds you in a place of safety and health in adjusting to the new normal with quarantined days. These certainly are challenging times as our community, our nation and our world face economic uncertainty and major disruptions in our daily life, including caring for our loved ones while coping with closures to school and childcare facilities and demands or providing for educational and childcare needs. Our thoughts are with those of you who may be unwell, anxious, or grieving during this time.

What a frightening, head-spinning month we have had. Just recently, we were finalizing plans for the 2020 Blueprints Conference, scheduled for April 27-29. Then on March 11th, we made the decision to cancel the Blueprints conference due to the coronavirus pandemic. Since then, life as we once knew it has radically changed. We are heartened, however, by the positive responses we received regarding the conference’s important and longstanding contribution to the field. Thank you. Our team created this PDF to assist our conference registrants in completing the necessary steps to receive refunds related to the 2020 Blueprints Conference.
 
As we all adapt to this new environment, Blueprints will continue to work on our mission of promoting effective preventive interventions and helping governmental agencies, foundations, and practitioners use strong evidence to make informed decisions when identifying programs and practices that provide a high probability of success when taken to scale in communities. It is this commitment that helps us persevere through the challenges brought about by COVID-19. We thank each one of you for your part in our community and for your involvement in this important effort.
 
We recognize that Blueprints has followers from all around the world. Wherever you are right now, we wish you well over the next weeks and months to come.
 
Sincerely, 


Pamela Buckley, PhD
Director and Co-Principal Investigator
Blueprints Initiative
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Pamela.Buckley@Colorado.edu


Karl G. Hill, PhD
Principal Investigator
Blueprints Initiative
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Karl.Hill@Colorado.edu

Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development is hosted by the University of Colorado Boulder, Institute of Behavioral Science, with current funding from Arnold Ventures and former funding from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Each intervention included in the Blueprints database has been reviewed carefully by an independent advisory panel that looked at research on the intervention’s impact, practical focus and potential for implementation in public systems.

Blueprints News & Resources
Relevant articles and helpful resources
Blueprints Advisory Board member and parenting scholar Dr. Frances Gardner, Professor of Child and Family Psychology in the Department of Social Policy and Intervention at the University of Oxford, has collaborated with the World Health Organization, UNICEF, the Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children, the Internet of Good Things, USAID and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop a website with open-access online parenting resources during COVID-19. Go here to learn more
 
Blueprints supports the Society for Prevention Research (SPR) in its efforts to encourage participation in the conversation about effective prevention strategies promoting protective factors around stress and anxiety, trauma, parental stress, and more especially during these difficult and uncertain times. SPR has asked that you connect with them online @SPROrg to share your knowledge, initiatives, and resources through your social media accounts using the hashtag #WeAreSPR.
 
MDRC is a nonprofit organization that designs promising new interventions, evaluates existing programs using the highest research standards, and provides technical assistance to build better programs and deliver effective interventions at scale. Blueprints responded to MDRC’s new project, “Reconnecting Youth: Putting Out-of-School, Out-of-Work Youth on a Path to Self-Sufficiency,” by recommending two Blueprints Promising programs: Youth Villages LifeSet and Year Up. MDRC’s project is seeking information about effective programs that provide services to help young people (ages 16-24) advance on education and employment pathways. To learn more, go to MDRC’s website. 

 
The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) recently released a statement on Functional Family Therapy-Gangs (FFT-G). Blueprints certified the article referenced in this statement (Gottfredson et al., 2018) and decided FFT-G is part of Functional Family Therapy (FFT), a Model Plus Blueprints Program. The certified outcomes include delinquency and criminal behavior and illicit drug use but not gang involvement. Users interested in a program that has been evaluated with a population that includes gangs can locate FFT on the Blueprints program webpage by searching under “program type” and selecting “gang prevention and reduction.” Go here to read more

Featured Model Program
Project Towards No Drug Abuse (TND)

Blueprints Certified: 1997
Ages Served: Late Adolescence (15-18) – High School
Program Outcomes: Alcohol, Illicit Drug Use, Tobacco, Violence 

A classroom-based drug prevention program designed for at-risk youth that aims to prevent teen drinking, smoking, marijuana, and other hard drug use.

Learn more > >

Featured Promising Program
 Learning Together

Blueprints Certified: 2020
Ages Served: Early Adolescence (12-14) – Middle School
Program Outcomes: Alcohol, Antisocial-aggressive Behavior, Bullying, Conduct Problems, Delinquency and criminal Behavior, Illicit Drug Use, Mental Health, Sexual Risk Behaviors, Tobacco. 

Learning Together is a school-based intervention grounded in schoolwide policies and systems, restorative practices, and social and emotional education with adolescents to reduce bullying and aggression and promote various dimensions of health and wellbeing. The program includes all-school staff trainings, restorative practices delivered by staff and specialized restorative practices for more serious behavior problems, action group meetings comprised of students and staff, and teacher-delivered lessons on social and emotional skills. The program lasts three years, during grades 8-10 in the United Kingdom (or middle school in the United States).

Learn more > >

Blueprints Interventions in the News
In case you’ve missed them, here are a few newspaper articles and web postings that feature some of our Blueprint’s Model and Promising Programs:
  • The Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) recently announced that seven NFP graduates will serve as “Parent Ambassadors” traveling the nation telling their stories and advocating for the evidence-based program, by engaging policymakers and the public to build awareness of the benefits of the NFP program. NFP (a Blueprints Model program) is a community health program in which nurses work with low-income, first-time pregnant mothers from prenatal care through the child’s second birthday. Go here to learn more about NFP’s Parent Ambassadors. 
  • More on Nurse-Family Partnership: The Tennessee Department of Human Services recently awarded a $5 million grant to East Tennessee State University’s (ETSU) NFP which provides service for mothers from prenatal care through the child’s second birthday. NFP began working with ETSU in 2016, and since then has served over 300 women and seen the birth of 31 healthy babies. Read more about the award here. 
  • As part of the city’s implementation of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Evidence2SuccessTM framework, Community leaders in Memphis are implementing two Blueprints Promising programs with the purpose of improving the health, academic success and emotional well-being of African American students: (1) Strong African American Families for teens living in rural communities with the aim to prevent conduct problems, substance use and other risky behaviors, and (2) Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools, which aims to reduce children’s post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, as well as anxiety and depression resulting from exposure to violence. Go here to learn more about the efforts being made for Memphis African American students. 
  • Through Jefferson County (Colorado’s) Communities that Care (CTC) program, 14 high school students were able to attend the Youth Leadership Initiative Conference held Feb. 3-6 in Washington, D.C. where the students discussed with some of the nation’s leaders the major issues teenagers face and how grant funding has helped youth promote positive social change. CTC is a Blueprints Promising program. Go here to learn more.
  • Big Brothers Big Sisters of Shelby & Darke County in Ohio was recently awarded with grants from the Walmart Foundation totaling $3,500. The program provides mentoring services to over 300 youth in this service area. Big Brothers Big Sisters is a mentoring program that matches a volunteer adult mentor to an at-risk child or adolescent. The goal of the program is to improve academic success, attitudes and behaviors, and provide social and cultural enrichment to at-risk youth. Blueprints certified this program as Promising. Read more about the award here. 
  • After studies showed that Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) (a Blueprints Model program) positively impacted behavioral and academic outcomes, educators and school board members in Frederick, Maryland are looking to expand the social-emotional learning program and implement it in all pre-k through second grade classrooms this school year. PATHS is a classroom-based enrichment program designed to reduce aggression and behavior problems. Go here to learn more about PATHS implementation in Frederick, MD.
     

© 2019 Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development, Regents of the University of Colorado. All rights reserved. 

Our mailing address is:
University of Colorado Boulder | Institute of Behavioral Science
483 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309


Issue No. 12

 


Welcome to the Blueprints Bulletin



We look forward to helping elevate evidence-based programs by sharing information about our programs and what we are doing at Blueprints. Enjoy!

Leadership Letter:
Greetings from Pamela Buckley and Karl Hill

It is with great excitement that we highlight two current events happening at Blueprints. We also want to share with you our successes of 2019.

Registration for the April 27-29 2020 Blueprints conference is opening this month! Please go to our conference website to read about the conference and click here for more information on how to register.

Our Blueprints website has three new and exciting features! (1) Users now can export searches of certified programs to a spreadsheet. This downloaded file contains information on program ratings, target populations and settings, certified outcomes, and risk and protective factors impacted by each certified program. (2) Searches of non-certified programs can also now be downloaded to a spreadsheet that provides the program name, rating and brief description. And (3) Our site has improved print enhancements to the fact sheets of all Blueprints-certified programs, including the ability to save a fact sheet to a PDF file. When you go to a fact sheet, click <-Printable Version>, then click <-Print Page->, and under “Destination” scroll down to where it says “Save as PDF”. Check out our website to start taking advantage of the new features.

We accomplished a lot in 2019! (1) We are proud to report that we reviewed 55 unique interventions and 113 individual articles or reports, and certified three interventions. Many of the articles we reviewed in 2019 came to our attention through published scientific studies that we found in comprehensive searches of the evaluation literature, databases, and journals. In addition, we searched blogs, the internet, and other registries to locate evaluation studies. We also reviewed interventions by request (click here to nominate an intervention). This month’s newsletter highlights preventive interventions for college students 18 to 24 years old.  Please follow us on Facebook and Twitter as we are constantly updating our registry.  (2)  We hosted two meetings for the Blueprints Advisory Board, a distinguished panel of methodological experts with a variety of content expertise. (3) We launched a website that is more accessible and mobile-friendly, and developed a webinar on navigating our upgraded website. (4) We hosted Blueprints board member and scholar, Dr. Velma McBride Murry of Vanderbilt University, who gave a talk on how to maintain fidelity to theoretical foundations and core components while modifying experimentally-proven programs to meet participants’ needs (click here to view Dr. McBride Murry’s presentation). And (5) we planned for the 2020 Blueprints biennial conference.

Thank you to everyone who helped support these efforts. We are excited and ready for 2020!

Happy Holidays!

Sincerely, 


Pamela Buckley, PhD
Director and Co-Principal Investigator
Blueprints Initiative
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Pamela.Buckley@Colorado.edu


Karl G. Hill, PhD
Principal Investigator
Blueprints Initiative
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Karl.Hill@Colorado.edu

Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development is hosted by the University of Colorado Boulder, Institute of Behavioral Science, with current funding from Arnold Ventures and former funding from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Each intervention included in the Blueprints database has been reviewed carefully by an independent advisory panel that looked at research on the intervention’s impact, practical focus and potential for implementation in public systems.

2019 in Review
By the numbers
Below is a summary of our year in review. 

Interventions Reviewed & Certified in the Past Year

•  Number of Unique Interventions Reviewed = 55
•  Number of Individuals Articles or Reports Reviewed = 113
•  Number of Interventions Certified = 3

Overcome Social Anxiety (Promising)
Added: Dec. 11, 2019
Learn more

Red Light Purple Light: A Self-Regulation Intervention (Promising)
Added: Apr. 14, 2019
Learn more

Bottom Line College Advising Model (Promising)
Added: Mar. 4, 2019
Learn more

2020 Blueprints Conference
April 27-29, 2020
The Blueprints Conference disseminates knowledge designed to bridge the gap between research and practice by convening evaluators, prevention experts, program designers, policymakers, community leaders, advocates, practitioners and funders to share ideas and learn about experimentally-proven interventions (EPIs) designed to prevent problem behavior and enhance positive development. Conference sessions focus on providing guidance and tools that enhance the adoption and implementation of Blueprints interventions, as well as research related to the adoption, implementation and sustainability of EPIs.

Our morning keynote panel scheduled for April 28, 2020 includes Jon Baron, Vice President of the Evidence-Based Policy Initiative at Arnold Ventures and Cindy Guy, Vice President of Research, Evaluation, Evidence and Data for the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The session is titled Private Sector Investment in Experimentally Proven Interventions.

The panelists for our April 29 morning keynote panel, titled Public Sector Investment in Experimentally Proven Interventions, include Michael Pennington from the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency, Julie Revaz from the Connecticut Judicial Branch and Craig PoVey from the Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, who will be discussing how their states have successfully scaled up Blueprints-certified programs.

Make sure you are following us on Facebook and Twitter, as well as checking the Conference Website for updates on our upcoming conference, scheduled for April 27-29, 2020.

We look forward to seeing you at the Blueprints Conference in 2020!

Featured Model Program
Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS)

Blueprints Certified: 2012
Ages Served: Early Adulthood (19-22)
Program Outcome: Alcohol

A brief motivational intervention for high-risk college students that uses alcohol screening and feedback to reduce problem, excessive, and binge drinking by enhancing motivation to change, promoting healthier choices, reviewing myths and facts about alcohol, and teaching coping skills to moderate drinking.
Learn more > >

Featured Promising Program
Overcome Social Anxiety

Blueprints Certified: 2019
Ages Served: Early Adulthood (19-22) | Adult
Program Outcome: Anxiety 

The Overcome Social Anxiety program aims to help college students improve their social anxiety through cognitive behavioral therapy. The program is administered online and targets college students showing high levels of anxiety. Participants complete the program over a period of four to six months and receive email reminders to complete the modules
Learn more > >

Blueprints News & Resources
Relevant articles and helpful resources

In case you’ve missed them, here are a few newspaper articles and web postings that feature some of our Blueprint’s Model and Promising Programs:
  • Goodwill Industries of Central Indiana, which began serving families in 2011 with funding from the Affordable Care Act Maternal Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, is implementing the Nurse-Family Partnership. Click here and here to read more about this initiative.
  • The State of Minnesota was awarded a $2.5 million grant to implement LifeSkills Training  to middle school students beginning in Fall 2020. Read more about the award here.
  • Big Brothers Big Sisters celebrates a big milestone of operation in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Read more here:

© 2019 Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development, Regents of the University of Colorado. All rights reserved. 

Our mailing address is:
University of Colorado Boulder | Institute of Behavioral Science
483 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309


Issue No. 11

 


Welcome to the Blueprints Bulletin



We look forward to helping elevate evidence-based programs by sharing information about our certified interventions and process at Blueprints.

Leadership Letter:
Greetings from Pamela Buckley and Karl Hill

Part of Blueprints’ mission is to advance national and international dialogue on the importance of adopting high scientific standards and promoting strong interventions. Blueprints staff are working with local, state, national and international governments to implement science-based policy related to prevention. In this past year, Blueprints staff worked with the State of Colorado to develop their first State Strategic Plan for Drug Prevention (Putting Prevention Science to Work: Colorado’s Statewide Strategic Plan for Primary Prevention of Substance Abuse, 2019-2024), with the city of Malmö, Sweden to guide their selection of evidence based programs, and with representatives from the European Union’s EuroHealthNet to coordinate prevention registries internationally.

With the goal of outreach, Blueprints staff also participate in regular events at the local, state, national and international levels to promote high standards in prevention research, policy and implementation. Pamela Buckley participated on a panel titled Synthesizing Research Evidence at the Yidan Prize Conference Series titled “The Americas: The Future of Evidence and Innovation in Education” (Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, May 2019). Additionally, Karl Hill presented on Challenges and Solutions in Translating Evidence-Based Research into Practice to a wide range of national and international audiences including: the European Union Society for Prevention Research (Lisbon, Portugal, October 2018); the EU’s Meeting on Best Practice Portals (Cologne, Germany, June 2019); at the Bundeszentrale für gesundheitliche Aufklärung (Cologne, Germany, June 2019); the Trygg & Säker meeting (Malmö, Sweden, August 2019); the European Union Society for Prevention Research (Ghent, Belgium, September 2019); and the Montana State Drug Prevention meeting (Butte, Montana, September 2019). Collectively, Blueprints’ contributions to these meetings were very well received.

It is critically important to develop and maintain the Blueprints registry. It is also important that communities know about Blueprints as a prevention registry that people can trust. Participation in these presentations reflects our efforts to advance the dialog on prevention.

As always, thank you for your continued interest in and support of Blueprints.

Sincerely,


Pamela Buckley, PhD
Director and Co-Principal Investigator, Blueprints Initiative
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Pamela.Buckley@colorado.edu


Karl G. Hill, PhD
Principal Investigator
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Karl.Hill@Colorado.edu

We want your feedback on the new & improved Blueprints website

We have received a lot of great feedback on the upgraded Blueprints website launched this spring with support from Arnold Ventures. However, we strive for excellence. If you have not done so already, we would appreciate if you would take a few minutes to complete our website survey to let us know your thoughts about the site. We really appreciate your time and value your feedback!

Click here to fill out a survey comprised of only 9 items:

Take Our Website Survey

Registration for the Blueprints Conference is Approaching
Be sure to join us in Denver in April 2020 as we set the foundation for ongoing collaboration among advocates dedicated to the programs that provide positive results. Registration for the 2020 Conference will open soon. Rates for the conference are as follows:
  • Early Bird Rate: $310 (through February 23) 
  • Regular Rate: $395 
  • Pre-Conference: $150 
We will send out more announcements about registration in the weeks and months to come. Also, feel free to check out our website here:

Register

Blueprints Conference Sponsors & Exhibitors
It still is not too late to sponsor the upcoming Blueprints Conference! Our next conference is April 27-29, 2020 and would not be possible without the support of our sponsors. Sponsorship and exhibit opportunities are available to increase your organization’s visibility during the conference, as well as to support our mission to provide a first-class conference that offers continuing education and networking opportunities for model and promising experimentally proven interventions. Click here to learn more about becoming either a sponsor or an exhibitor:

Learn More

Family First Prevention Services Act
The Title IV- E Prevention Services Clearinghouse was established by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to conduct an objective and transparent review of research on programs and services intended to provide enhanced support to children and families and prevent foster care placements.The Prevention Services Clearinghouse, developed in accordance with the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFPSA) as codified in Title IV-E of the Social Security Act, rates programs and services as well-supported, supported, promising, or does not currently meet criteria. The registry has updated the set of approved prevention programs eligible for Title IV-E reimbursement. Four of the programs featured in the clearinghouse as supported, well-supported, or promising are also certified by Blueprints.
These include:

We have featured two of these programs in this month’s newsletter.

Featured Model Program
Nurse-Family Partnership  
Blueprints Certified: 1997
Ages Served: Infant (0-2)
Program Outcome: Child Maltreatment, Cognitive Development, Delinquency and Criminal Behavior, Internalizing, Mental Health-Other, Physical Health and Well-Being, Preschool Communication/Language Development, Reciprocal Parent-Child Warmth

A nurse home visiting program for first-time pregnant mothers that sends nurses to work one-on-one with the pregnant women to improve prenatal and child rearing practices through the child’s second birthday.

Learn More

Featured Promising Program
Parent-Child Interaction Therapy
Blueprints Certified: 2012
Ages Served: Early Childhood (3-4) – Preschool, Late Childhood (5-11)-K/Elementary
Program Outcome: Antisocial-aggressive Behavior, Child Maltreatment, Conduct Problems

A program designed for children and their parents that focuses on decreasing child behavior problems, increasing positive parent behaviors, and improving the quality of the parent-child relationship.

Learn More

Blueprints Interventions in the News
Recent articles and web postings featuring Blueprints Model Plus, Model and Promising interventions:

Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development is developed and managed by the University of Colorado Boulder, Institute of Behavioral Science, with current funding from Arnold Ventures and former funding from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Each intervention included in the database has been reviewed carefully by an independent advisory panel that looked at research on the intervention’s impact, practical focus and potential for implementation in public systems.

Facebook

Twitter

Website

Copyright © 2019 Blueprints Programs, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
University of Colorado Boulder | Institute of Behavioral Science
483 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309


 

Dr. Velma McBride Murry: Scaling up Evidence-Based Programs in Community Settings – Balancing Fidelity and Real-World “Adjustments” to Model Implementation

Abstract: Program developers must provide additional information to help facilitators make appropriate modifications to cultural contexts and social trends. However, modifications cannot interfere with effectiveness. In this talk, Dr. McBride Murry of Vanderbilt University discusses how to maintain fidelity to theoretical foundations and core components while modifying experimentally-proven programs to meet participants’ needs.

Bio: Dr. McBride Murry has conducted research on African-American parents and youth for over a decade and identified proximal, malleable protective factors that deter emotional problems and risk engagement in youth. Professor McBride Murry’s goal is to disseminate experimentally proven programs (EPPs) for uptake in community-based organizations, schools, primary health care settings and faith-based organizations, and examine their efficacy in real-world settings. At CU Boulder, Dr. McBride Murry serves on the Advisory Board of Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development, a globally-recognized online registry of EPPs.

Dr. Murry’s Powerpoint presentation may be downloaded here.

Sponsored By: Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development and the Center for the Study on Violence Behavior, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado Boulder

Issue No. 5




We look forward to helping elevate evidence-based programs by sharing information about our programs and what we are doing at Blueprints. Enjoy!

A Letter From Our Director:
The 7th Blueprints Conference is Almost Here

There’s excitement in the air as we approach the date of our 7th biennial Blueprints Conference. This is a fantastic opportunity for persons engaged in youth violence prevention and healthy youth development to come together to network, share information, and learn from experts in the field. The overarching goal of the conference is to provide information on evidence-based programs and guidance and tools to help consumers implement these programs successfully.

Please join us on April 30 for the preconference and May 1-2, 2018, for the main conference in Westminster, Colorado, for this unique experience that unites a broad spectrum of participants from policy, program development, research, and implementation. We promise that you will not be disappointed!

Learn more about what you can expect to find at this year’s conference.

Register for the conference today!

Sincerely,

Sharon Mihalic
Director, Blueprints Initiative
Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence
Institute of Behavioral Science
University of Colorado Boulder
sharon.mihalic@colorado.edu

Tom Cook, a member of the Blueprints Advisory Board, recently spoke at the Institute of Behavioral Science at CU-Boulder on (1) the standards of the different program clearinghouses and what constitutes acceptable evidence, and (2) when quasi-experimental designs reliably reproduce estimates from randomized experiments.

 

Featured Model Program
Functional Family Therapy (FFT)

Blueprints Certified: 1996
Ages Served: 11-18
Program Outcome: Delinquency and Criminal Behavior, Illicit Drug Use
Functional Family Therapy (FFT) is a short-term family therapy intervention and juvenile diversion program helping at-risk children and delinquent youth, ages 11-18, to overcome adolescent behavior problems, conduct disorder, substance abuse and delinquency?

Learn more about Functional Family Therapy…

Featured Promising Program
Communities That Care (CTC)

Blueprints Certified: 2008
Ages Served: Infant to Early Adulthood (0-22)
Program Outcome: Alcohol, Delinquency and Criminal Behavior, Tobacco, Violence
Communities That Care (CTC) is a prevention system designed to reduce levels of adolescent delinquency and substance use through the selection and use of effective preventive interventions tailored to a community’s specific profile of risk and protection.

Learn more about Communities That Care…

Join the Center for CTC and state partners for a webinar:
Using Communities That Care to Boost Your Prevention Infrastructure
Tuesday, January 30, 2018
11 a.m. Pacific / 12 p.m. Mountain / 1 p.m. Central / 2 p.m. Eastern

Blueprints News & Resources
Relevant articles and helpful resources
Here are a few articles that feature some of our Blueprint’s Model Programs:

 

Register for the 2018 Blueprints Conference today!
Join us in Colorado this spring for our bi-annual conference. Early-bird registration is now open and it’s shaping up to be another great event.
 

Legislative Update
Stay Informed 

Legislative support is key to the elevation of our programs. We would encourage you to keep an eye on these bills as they progress.

Copyright © 2018 Blueprints Programs, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
University of Colorado Boulder | Institute of Behavioral Science | Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence
483 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309